Doug Stockdale's Singular Images

October 3, 2015

Paris – the party Seine

Filed under: Art, Photography, Projects/Series — Tags: , , , — Doug Stockdale @ 5:45 pm

The Party Seine_6988_Paris_Stockdale

Untitled (the party Seine, Paris, 2010) copyright 2015 Douglas Stockdale

In 2010 I had an opportunity to be in Paris during the summer and found a rite of summer (or anytime that is warm enough) that is frequently celebrated in this city; partying along the banks of the river Seine, thus the punster title of the photograph.

We had just completed a Seine river cruise in the later afternoon, but turned dark on our journey back. During our short tourist cruise, all along the banks of the river was a continuous party in progress; couples, small groups, big groups, usually toasting us with their glasses of wine. Really fun as everyone was really enjoying the balmy night and each others company.

As we walked the along the banks of the Seine after the cruise, I noted this one region across the river with a fun group and an interesting illumination of the party in progress. Unfortunately I did not have my tripod. Fortunately there was a waist high wall at this same location which did duty as my impromptu tripod. I also figured that I would not be lucky with only one exposure, so I continued to photography from this location for the next couple of minutes and was rewarded with this composition. With some careful cropping and tweaking in PhotoShop, I created a really great memory for me.

This image was just selected today by the Duncan Miller Gallery for their YourDailyPhotograph, so it’s available for a short time for a nice price from their gallery. So maybe some lucky person will have this print as part of their collection as a surrogate memory for a similar occasion.


October 1, 2015

OCMA update

Filed under: Art, Photography, Projects/Series — Tags: , , — Doug Stockdale @ 8:16 pm


Untitled (OCMA administration office, Newport Beach, CA 2015) copyright 2015 Douglas Stockdale

Last weekend was interesting time for me at the Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA). First, the Deputy Director had selected one of my photographs to hang in the administration space, which I dropped off in the morning. This is the second opportunity to have my work hang on a semi-permanent basis here, earlier a selection of 4 of my landscape black and white photographs were here for about a year. This time a photograph from my Ciociaria photobook project was selected and best part was this photograph was already framed, as it was curated into an exhibition last year at Orange County Center for Contemporary Art (OCCCA).

After dropping off the photograph, I was then the event photographer for a “Family Fun Day” that the museum was hosting for the day in conjunction with their exhibition for Young Chinese Artists. It was a walk about while I captured candid’s of the families as they interacted with the various craft booths that the museum had arranged. Since I had to immediately leave town for an assignment, I am just now going through the first edit of the photographs that I captured. So wait to see what “develops”. One thing that we did come to terms on is that I retain the copyright on all of the photographs and they get some first time rights. So I will see how this aspect evolves.


August 7, 2015

Buzzz about Branding for artists

Filed under: Art, Art Market, Photography, Projects/Series — Tags: , , , — Doug Stockdale @ 4:59 pm


Neighborhoods (LA, 2015) copyright 2015 Douglas Stockdale

Recently there has been a spat of articles recently published about the necessity of artists to “brand” themselves to improve their presence in the art world, which of course includes photography. This of course means that the galleries can increase the price of the artists works, which should benefit the artists as well. As to the collectors, this might benefit them too if they are into art as an investment.

So what does this all mean and is it good or bad for an artist? In the broadest sense, it means that you might instantly recognize an artist’s work at first glance. Jeff Koon’s bubble sculptures come to mind. The modern works of Ansel Adams are almost a trademark, e.g. Moonrise over Hernandez, thus an effective brand. I think the contemporary black & white dreamy photographs of Keith Carter and Susan Burnstine or the wide angle photographs of Lee Freidlander or the gritty black & white photographs of Roger Ballan as recognizable “brands”. It means that a photographer/artist has a particular way of translating what they feel or see into a visual record. It usually means that they do this somewhat consistently.

Yes and if another photographer thinks that this “look” is urber cool, they might try in some way to emulate this look, thus for photographers, a brand can be borrowed. I think of the number of long exposure black and white photographs of water that other photographers published after Michael Keena’s raise to fame. Nevertheless, they all found themselves being compared to Keena, much like my early black and white landscape photographs were compared to Adams. At first I took this as a compliment as to the quality of my photographic work, but then after a while, this became a detriment, as it implied that I did not have an original vision, but just copying some else, thus living in some else’s dead shadow.

The pro’s of a brand have been stated above, an artist becomes “recognizable”, thus a greater intrinsic value is given to their work and many good things can come from that. As to the cons, one that comes to mind is that like having a nice pair of well broken in hiking boots, you might find your self limited in what you can do. Can’t do much long distance swimming wearing hiking boots. Thus if your recognized style (brand) is black and white documentary photographs using very wide angle lens (my hypothetical), a color portfolio of non-documentary photographs might not be as well received. Thus the reason why some artists abhor being “branded” as a potential limit on their creative options.

If one really, really enjoys making photographs in a particular way and you like how the resulting photographs turn out with a unique set of processes, e.g. large format tintype portraits, then you might find your self creating a style or brand.

So to understand that the buzz about why an artist should have a brand (a particular visual appearance) can become a double edged sword if you are not careful.

For me, (yes, I have a MBA, thus graduate level classes on this subject), I am not sure that I have a particular look per se (I do enjoy looking at and creating both black and white photographs as well as color photographs), I would rather think that my brand is my conceptual investigation of memory and identity. Hopefully that will allow me a lot of latitude on how I choose to investigate this subject.


December 22, 2014

Elizabeth Avedon’s Best Photography Books for 2014 – and I am on it!


Pine Lake, copyright 2014 Douglas Stockdale

As a book artist and photobook specialist, this is the time of year that I provide kudo’s to all of the photographers, photobook designers, photobook publishers and the book artists who use photography as a part of their creative medium. This year I was asked by Manik Katyal, the Editor/Publisher of Emaho magazine to provide five photobook titles for the Emaho annual list of Best Photobook lists. So since getting my list down to just five, I needed to again published my own Interesting Photobooks of 2014 on my other blog, The Photobook.

What came as a very pleasant surprise is when the amazing NYC book designer Elizabeth Avedon (yes, a familiar last name to those following photography over the years) selected Pine Lake as one of her Best Photography Books of 2014. A total surprise as this is a very limited edition artist book (edition of 25 plus 2 A/P’s) and thus I am assuming not many have actually held or seen.

What a sweet ending to the year and which reminds me that I need to get my butte back into gear and finish my next limited edition book Bluewater Shore, the second of the three photo-narratives plan for this series.




July 8, 2014

Keep Singular Images ad free – purchase a print!


Untitled (#39 Memory pod series, Middle Age) copyright 2014 Douglas Stockdale

August 2014 Update: this offer has expired! I will soon have some special print offers and due to all of the feedback I have received since posting this (thank you one and all), all prints will be in limited editions.


The Management


I founded the Singular Image photo-blog seven years ago, in part to provide an on-going discussion of my evolving vision, as well as in the words of Gary Winogrand, “to see what my photographs looked like”. This effort has been self-funded until now and now I require some additional assistance. Thus I am going to make what I think it is a really nice offer (actually described by another photographer as a sophisticated offer). Rather than requesting outright donations to support this blog, I am going to instead, much like Kickstarter, provide a special print offer. This is an opportunity for you to purchase an open-edition archival pigment print of any photograph of mine that I have posted on this blog in the past seven years. There is only one caveat; the print size will be limited to an outside dimension of 8 ½” x 11” otherwise the print will move into my Limited Edition sizes (and a much different pricing!).

So here is the print offer to support this blog:

Each open-edition archival pigment print, 8 ½” x 11”, matte finish, signed on verso (back of the print) is available for $100.00 U.S.D., which normally sell for $200.00. The shipping and handling (s/h) of each order is $25.00 U.S.D. for anywhere in the world, so multiple print orders to one destination will only require one s/h charge (even more savings!!). The print will not be matted and the photograph selected must be made by me (as I have also from time to time discussed some other photographers work and illustrated the post with their photographs on the blog). Easy as eating pie!

So page through this blog, find the photograph(s) you like (Yes, you can purchase as many as you like) and then leave me a note in the comments section of the post that you want this print offer and provide me with your email address. I will send you a PayPal invoice and ask for a shipping address and soon this print will be your hands.

I am not exactly sure how many photographs I have posted over the past seven years (I am pretty sure that I have the negative or file with very few exceptions) but I believe that there are more than 890 photographs to choose from. If there are any potential conflicts with the photograph, I will let you know.

If you have any questions, email me!

So now please get started!!


As I hope you know and understand I really appreciate all of your support for these past seven years and now I hope for a few more years yet to come. Thanks!!

And if you are interested in a larger Limited Edition photograph, please contact me.


June 4, 2014

Sub-Warp Speed

Filed under: Art, Photography, Projects/Series — Tags: , , — Doug Stockdale @ 1:26 am

-6-03-14 sub-warp_speed_02

Untitled series (Warp Speed #01 – #07) copyright 2014 Douglas Stockdale

This is a mini-project that explores the time-space continuum and the effects of traveling at sub-Warp Speed. With the advent of another Star Wars movie in the making and been awhile since the last release, most are not familiar with the experience of approaching light speed or what is looks like to peer into a gigantic interstellar black hole.

Enjoy & may the Force be with you!

-6-03-14 sub-warp_speed_03

-6-03-14 sub-warp_speed_01

-6-03-14 sub-warp_speed_04

-6-03-14 sub-warp_speed_05

-6-03-14 sub-warp_speed_06

-6-03-14 sub-warp_speed_07

April 29, 2014

Photo Independent & Paris Photo LA – 2014

Filed under: Art, Art Market, Photography — Tags: — Doug Stockdale @ 7:16 pm



Untitled, copyright 2014 Douglas Stockdale.

This past weekend there were two photographic fairs in L.A., and in fact they were adjacent to each other. The largest of these was the second Paris Photo LA held again on the back lot of the Paramont Picture Studios in Hollywood. I wrote about Paris Photo LA in a lot more detail and posted photos on The PhotoBook blog, as my main reason to attend Paris Photo LA was to look at and acquire photobooks.

Thus, a little about the Photo Independent fair. This was it’s first year and similar to events in Paris for Photo Paris, this venue is attempting to take advantage of the large crowds that the Paris Photo LA attracted last year (as well as this year!). In this case, the venue was another film studio, Raleigh Studios, literally across the street from Paramont on Melrose in Hollywood.

I was gifted by Susan Burnstine with a VIP pass for the Friday’s opening night and I was able to weasel this into a PRESS pass and then onto the Raleigh Studios back-lot parking. I took an hour to walk the pre-opening and take some photographs before heading across the street to Paris Photo LA. I returned back for the 7pm VIP opening and walked the two stages where the photographers were exhibiting. The emphasis of Photo Independent was on individual photographers showing their work, versus the emphasis (and pricing) on galleries exhibiting at the Paris Photo LA. Note: unlike Photo l.a. earlier this year, I noted that Paris Photo LA had a much higher percentage of solo exhibits.

First the back lot stages at Raleigh Studios are small than Paramont Pictures, thus it seemed both more intimate and smaller in scale overall. It also meant that for the opening night, it did not take long to get this place crammed with VIPs that were strolling across the street from Paris Photo LA. I saw a number of familiar faces, thus I think the location strategy for Photo Independent was very successful as they were trying to do their best to not step on big brothers toes.

Not sure how the Photo Independent turned out for those who participated as I have not heard from anyone this morning. Most were going to be happy to break even with their investment and appreciate the heavy crowds that resulted from their proximity of Paris Photo LA. and hopefully make some good connections.







January 10, 2014

New Year’s housekeeping – start of 2014


10×10 American Photobooks exhibiton catalog, copyright 2013 10×10 Photobooks

Today was a bit of virtual housekeeping day, as with all of the events that crashed into the end of the year, there were some things that I did not complete that I should have. Most of these tasks are related to my personal self promotion as an artist/photographer, but in the end, the cobblers kids don’t have shoes. Yeah, those subtle things that I need to do for myself go to the sidelines while I complete the tasks at hand; ship books to bookstores, send out invoices, attend book fairs, respond to editorial requests about my books, etc.

So in order of what I did today  (since I kinda hear you asking), is 1. update my web site with the shout-outs regarding my artist book Pine Lake, 2. update this same web site with some 2013 accomplishments (you probably get the idea that keeping a web site updated is viewed as a necessary pain. Yep!), 3. finishing some Facebook shout-outs regarding my photobook Ciociaria and last, 4. publishing a commentary on the 10×10 American Photobook exhibition catalog in which I am featured. sigh.

The three publications which featured Pine Lake at the end of the year were easy to copy & paste into the web site. Yes, this blog is more interactive and easier to use repository of links, etc., so the links are over to your right under the category of Web Ink.

Same for a few updates to the my CV on the web site. My book Ciociaria was accepted into the Indie Photobook Library (IPL) a donation that was made possible by the support of Ella and Zachary Webb.  hmmm, Pine Lake would be another possibility for IPL, so I am now looking for a sponsor who might want to help make this happen.

And last is the review of the 10×10 American Photobooks catalog that includes my selection of photobooks for this series of exhibitions.

Okay, Done!


January 8, 2014

Bluewater Shore – Maquette


Artist photobook maquette cover, Bluewater Shore, copyright 2014 Douglas Stockdale.

A couple of days ago I started a discussion about my next artist photobook for 2014, Bluewater Shore, which I have just finished the first maquette in preparation of getting some feedback from friends at photo l.a. next week.

First, in the photo of the marquette above, the artist photobook dummy appears kinda of chunky, but that is due to my creative process. At this point in time, I have not finalized the selection of the interior photographs, nor the sequence. The image size and margins on the page will be the same as those I used for Pine Lake. Thus after I developed the marquette’s framework, the photographs are being held in place with paper clips (you can see them at the edge of the page) to facilitate changes. Thus, the thickness is a bit unwieldy. When I am pretty sure of the image selection and sequencing, then I will probably tape the images into place.

One change that I am making to Bluewater Shore  is the book binding process of the interior block to the book cover and I am using another manual process; pamphlet sewn stitch. For the Pine Lake artist book, I had used an aluminum prong binding process, almost identical to what was used by Kodak and Ansco for their promotional processing booklets. The downside to the manual prong binding process was the tedious punching of the holes and getting the alignment of the holes correct. Since I was using a hand paper punch, I could only punch three pages at a time. I busted a couple of these punches when I pushed the amount of pages to hole punch. One result of the prong binding was another reason to keep the edition size of Pine Lake to 25.

With the pamphlet sewn stitch, still a very manual process, it is keeping me literally in touch with each and every photobook that I am making. Even the ice pick tool to make the holes for the pamphlet stitching is from the same 1940’s period as the found photographs, or maybe even earlier. A very subtle, essentially unseen, and metaphoric book binding process.

The colors for Bluewater Shore were selected from those used in the same late 1940’s period as my short story is set in. The Canson 300 gm cover is a Sky Blue and the waxed Irish linen thread is a wonderful pink, aptly called Bubble Gum. You can still find these two colors in many of the bathrooms and kitchens of the 1950’s and probably 1960’s houses in the US. My parent’s house in Michigan comes quickly to mind. Oh yes, these were two of my mom’s favorite colors as well, thus another symbolic element.

What I did determine during the construction of this maquette is that my HP desktop printer can not process the 300 gm cover stock. This heavy paper jams the paper feeder and it jams it really well. Thus back to my Epson 4800, which I had suspected that I would need to use and I should have started with it to begin with. sigh. Some lessons are harder to learn than others.

A big change for Bluewater Shore will be that this artist photobook will not have the matching hand made wood frame and cover as did Pine Lake. Since I want to increase the edition size and keep this artist book reasonable priced, I need to make some changes, this probably being one. One thought is to have a large edition of just the stiff-cover book, and a smaller edition of the hand made frame and stiff-cover book. Nice thing about being an artist, I can change my mind on this.

Another change I am making is the printing of the interior pages. With Pine Lake, I had utilized laser printing from a local quick print shop. hmmmm, an area for improvement.  For Bluewater Shore, I will be using an offset lithographic printing process, probably two color. Still working the print, fold and trim details out with a local printer. I will have the printer also fold and trim to a saddle stitch style (without the saddle stitching) so that the signatures will be ready to stitch to the cover. I also plan to increase the limited edition size to 100 or more.

Another draw back to the small edition of Pine Lake was the limited samples available to send out for reviews; there just weren’t any. Thus Pine Lake ended up being under the radar a bit. So for Bluewater Shore, I want to have enough copies to send out to my fellow photobook reviewers to generate some buzzzzzzz. Or at least I hope it will get a little :- D


oh, as to the contents of the maquette, here’s a tease:


December 30, 2013

Pine Lake featured in Emaho Magazine


Pine Lake copyright 2013 Douglas Stockdale.

I was thinking earlier today that I should finish the year with a post about what my objectives were for next year and thoughts about this past year.

But then Manik Katyal, the Editor-in-Chief/Publisher of Emaho magazine disrupted my great plans with his article about Pine Lake. So how cool is that?!

I have to admit, what a very, very nice way to end the year. So check it out here.


Oh, and there are only a few copies of Pine Lake left now.

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