Doug Stockdale's Singular Images

February 25, 2014

Instant Nomad – Anaheim

Filed under: Instant Nomad, Photography, Projects/Series — Tags: , — Doug Stockdale @ 4:19 am

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untitled (Anaheim, CA) copyright 2014 Douglas Stockdale.

So I have been continuing to think about what makes the wider format of the Samsung 4 cell-camera images so intriguing. Perhaps it finally dawned on me and maybe I’m the last to figure this out but it’s a similar wide ratio as to my high-def t.v. It was one of those Olympic moments, glued to the the t.v. for a while and suffering through some dumb commercials when I finally noticed the similarities. I guess this wide ratio effect can also be termed cinematic.

Never thought of myself as a panoramic guy, but now I find it intriging. Interesting, but I think most of the full-frame digital cameras still defer to the old 35mm format ratio as the golden rule. The only panoramic camera that comes quickly to mind is the Hasselblad and if I recall correctly, it uses 35mm film, not the 120 film. Not just ready to make this small camera investment at the moment but if any of you want to donate one (or lend it for a couple of years) because your has an inch of dust on it and been sitting in the attic for the last five years, let me know.

Meanwhile, I continue to explore the use of this wide-format camera in conjunction with some projects, this photograph above is part of the Instant Nomad series.

Cheers!

February 21, 2014

Emaho magazine

Filed under: Art Market, Books, Photography, Projects/Series — Tags: , , — Doug Stockdale @ 9:34 pm

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“American” photobook titles, copyright 2014 Douglas Stockdale.

I have been just invited by Manik Katyal, founder, editor and publisher of EMAHO magazine to be a contributor to his magazine joining he and Colin Pantall as photobook reviewers. We are still working on the details of what that means, but the short answer is that he would like to co-publish my book reviews that I post on The Photobook blog. You may also recall that Katyal featured my artist book Pine Lake on EMAHO magazine.

Katyal has also asked that I focus on American photobooks, as Pantall is located in the UK and is predominantly covering the European photobook scene. When I stated The Photobook blog in 2009, one key aspect of this project was for me to look at photobooks beyond the borders of the U.S. as I see photobooks having a intercontinental reach. So this has stirred mixed emotions, but fortunately Katyal has not asked me to be a book reviewer exclusive to American photobooks.

With the internet and social media I observe a really quick mashup of ideas and concepts being shared amongst photographers and book makers. This request to be an American specialist is an interesting one. I am in the midst of reading America Latina Photographs (1960 – 2013) recently co-published by Museo Amparo, Fondation Cartier in conjunction with Thames & Hudson. American Latina covers an extensive and diverse region, extending from Argentina and Chile north to Mexico and includes the Caribbean islands. The curators/authors devolve into question of what does the term America Latina photography signify. I think the same beguiling question encircles the idea of American photobooks. Thus expect me to be equally broad and diverse while to looking at American photobooks.

I will start by broadly defining American photobooks as those created by someone born in America, someone who has moved to and resides at least a part of their time in America and photographers who reside in places other than in America who in turn investigate the culture, landscape and society of America.

An example I have in hand is Andreas Oetker-Kast’s recently published photobook Looking for Wonderland, a German photographer who made an American road trip investigation transversing across the U.S. Likewise Andrew Phelps, an American photographer who now resides in Austria who returned his family home to investigate a region of Arizona titled Haboob. And quintessential American photographers such as the late W. Eugene Smith and his three volume opus Big Book.

My photobook reviews will not be exclusive to the American photobook, but perhaps I will become a little more keen observant as to what is being published with regard to America.

Cheers!

footnote: the photograph of the American photobook stack, above, is also an investigation into the use of my recently expanded studio space. Another work in progress, but so far, so good.

Pine Lake – Out of Print

Filed under: Uncategorized — Doug Stockdale @ 7:29 am

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Pine Lake, copyright 2013 artist photobook by Douglas Stockdale

I just posted this same announcement on The PhotoBook blog, but I am really excited to announce that I recently arranged with photo-eye (Santa Fe, NM) book store to sell the last copies of the edition for my Pine Lake artist photobook. I believe that in publisher’s terms that when all copies are now in the hands of the bookstores that I am officially Out of Print. Wow, that did not take long.

So there is one remaining copy of the edition at As Issued, here on the left coast, and a couple with photo-eye and L’Ascensure Vegetal for Europe.  Pine Lake is SOLD OUT at the Reminders Photography Stronghold gallery in Japan.

I really do appreciate the great response to this book and my short semi-fictional story. As many of you have told me, it looks great in photographs on the web, but it’s awesome when holding the actual book object.

I suspect that I soon will be making the announcement that Pine Lake is SOLD OUT. very nice.

Cheers!

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February 8, 2014

Field notes – 02-05-14

Filed under: Photography, Projects/Series — Doug Stockdale @ 10:37 pm

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untitled (Aliso Viejo, CA, February 2014) copyright 2014 Douglas Stockdale.

Continuing to look at urban landscapes using a wider than “normal” perspective. Now thinking that the term panoramic implies too wide of a perspective for these photographs. Image cropped to a traditional 10×8 format below. Also thinking I should also consider a 6×6 square image as an alternative format. hmmmm.

These are my field notes for a book concept that I am considering.

Cheers!

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February 3, 2014

New project in the making

Filed under: Books, Photography, Projects/Series — Doug Stockdale @ 9:05 pm

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untitled (Aliso Viejo, CA, January 2014) copyright 2014 Douglas Stockdale.

Another interesting series of events that appear to be leading into a new photobook project. First, I have been using the wide format Samsung IV camera-phone to see what things looked like in these almost panoramic photographs. Then I was inspired to take some “documentary” photographs of the golf courses I have been playing lately with the Samsung. The what-am-I-doing-now variety of photographs. Relatively brainless, but kinda of interesting as to the results.

I am currently reading Paul Seawright’s latest photobook Volunteer just released by a new Irish photobook publisher Artist Photo Books. Seawright’s subject is the US military recruitment centers sprinkled around the country, but he does not photograph them directly. His viewpoint is looking away from these recruitment centers and out toward the urban landscape. It is his attempt to describe where, thus indirectly who, are the people that the military is seeking to recruit.

It is this idea of an indirect visual study that intrigues me. And thus the underlying concept for this new photographic project. I have a straw-man idea for the title, but still too soon. I need to play some more golf (hint, hint) and take some more photographs. Then see what photographic images start to accumulate.

Cheers!

February 2, 2014

Bluewater Shore & 2014 LA Art Book Fair

Filed under: Bluewater Shore - artist book, Books, Photography, Projects/Series — Doug Stockdale @ 5:47 am

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untitled (Bluewater Shore, maquette interior) copyright 2014 Douglas Stockdale

Attending the 2014 LA Art Book Fair with regard to spending some show and tell time with the Bluewater Shore maquette was a bit anticlimactic.

First, I attended on a Friday knowing that for these three day weekend events, Friday should be a little slower with a much smaller crowd, which was the case.  Thus if no one was lurking in front of the booth, there might be some time available with a friend for a quick look-n-see of my maquette. This is a sensitive moment, as the folks are primarily there to show-and-sell their books, but as friends, they can make some leeway with their time if they don’t feel pressed. Not recommended for a cold pitch when you have never met the person you want to approach. Nevertheless, after some shop-talk, I did get a couple of look-sees and some very, very nice feedback and interest. That is always nice.

Meeting up with some photobook/photographer friends who are roaming the isles is much easier and safer to approach and share. They usually have something they want you to look at or discuss as well, so a nice give and take, appreciated by both. These exchanges are generating more interest in my Bluewater Shore project.

Another of my key reasons for attending this particular event is to figure out who are the booksellers/galleries that are focusing on the true hand-made artist books. Regretfully there were not many. Let me correct that, I could not find one. Okay, maybe there is hope for one. There are rare book dealers who have created a after market for books that are now out of print, etc, and these books can get very expensive, over $5,000 and for some, well over that price. But although they have a market for high end books, they do not sell new artist books that can be very expensive compared to the commercial trade books. Even Printed Matter in NYC which attempts to be a zine and artist bookstore has a limit on their price point, preferring not to stock books that retail for more than $50.00. sigh.

So the good news, more validation for my Bluewater Shore project. (Since I am a guy, I am going to just ignore the bad news.)

Next week I am going to meet with a printer to discuss their digital versus offset litho printing and look at some options for paper stock. I will bring them the maquette for the design and layout as well as some match prints for the printing. Then they should be able to provide some print/fold/trim quotes for the single two-sided signature that I am envisioning. The elephant in the room is the low quantity of printed signatures that I need.

Cheers!

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